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Opening map (*.mxd) using ArcGIS Online?

Opening map (*.mxd) using ArcGIS Online?


I created a map yesterday using ArcMap on my laptop.

I do not have access to the programme right now.

Is it possible to open this map (mxd) file on ArcGIS online?


You would've had to have published your data onto AGOL in order to create a similar map to what you did in ArcMap on your laptop.

Without first putting the map/data onto AGOL, you are unable to view your map.


Opening map (*.mxd) using ArcGIS Online? - Geographic Information Systems

Exercise: Using ArcGIS Help

ArcGIS 's online documentation system should become your best friend while you are learning to use ArcGIS. The documentation is extensive and quite well written, in comparison to most other software applications' documentation. As you are leaning ArcGIS, you should automatically open Help and keep it open until you are finished with your ArcGIS session. One of the biggest differences between those who learn GIS quickly and those who take longer to learn, or never learn, is that the fast learners use Help extensively. The fast learners will be able to teach themselves a tremendous amount the slow learners will struggle a lot, attempt a lot of things through trial-and-error (mostly error) and learn relatively little.

    Start by finding ArcGIS, by navigating through the Start Button on the Windows Task Bar.

A banner will appear showing that ArcGIS is opening..

ArcMap will start with a dialog prompting you to either create a new empty map, a map template, or open an existing map (if you have been using maps previously, they will be listed in the dialog). We won't be working with maps today, so cancel the dialog.

You will see the ArcGIS application window that contains a single window (the Project Window) containing a few icons, a few menu choices, and a few buttons.

    There are several ways of starting ArcGIS 's on-line documentation ("Help") system:

    Open ArcGIS Help by selecting the shortcut for ArcGIS Desktop Help (in the same Windows Start menu location as ArcGIS ).
    ArcGIS help functions like any other Windows help system for other software applications.

The Contents tab contains all of the main topics in ArcGIS Help.

The contents are arranged in a hierarchical order. Each book icon represents an upper-level subject in the documentation. As you open these books, you will see other book icons, which represent subordinate subjects. Each subject contains topics and/or subordinate subjects.

The window at right hand side will show the introduction of that topic. In this exercise, you will see the topic: Displaying tables and know how to operate it within ArcMap.

Using the GIS Dictionary

ArcGIS help comes with a Glossary of terms. The dictionary is linked on the left-hand pane of the help application.

  1. Open the GIS Glossary by clicking on its link. The application will open.

You can find the definition of many different terms by using the GIS dictionary. Browse for a few more terms.

You have just learned how to open ArcGIS help, and how to search for help on a specific topic. The difference between those of you who learn a little or a lot about ArcGIS and GIS will be determined by those of you who learn to use and consult this on-line documentation. If you learn nothing else this quarter, you should learn to use ArcGIS 's Help. You will use online help more in the next lab exercise.


Retrieving symbology info from ArcMap document (.mxd)

I wish to retrieve symbology information from a mxd file I created from ArcMap 10.6.2 using the ArcGIS Pro API. Since I want to do this when the Pro application is not running, I cannot access the classes or interfaces under the ArcGIS.Desktop namespace.

Arc objects equivalent to what is needed would be the IMapDocument and IMapReader objects that allowed a map object to be created from the the mxd file path that has symbology information for every feature layer.

Would it be possible to retrieve this kind of information from the mxd file, or would the mxd file need to be converted to another type of file to be useable outside of Pro? From what I've researched so far, the .mapx file seems to have the symbology info I'm looking for. If it's possible to convert mxd to mapx, how would the mapx file be parsed through to get and save its symbology?

Do you have access to the ArcObjects SDK?

If so, it might be easier to write an ArcObjects app that translates renderers, symbols etc. from ArcObjects into CIM objects. Esri seems to be using CIM as the common foundation across all apps - except for Arcmap.

All CIM objects can be serialized to json. A symbology translator could read from mxds (using ArcObjects) and write json files (using ArcGIS.Core.CIM). You could then have a Pro Addin to deserialize the json to display it in Pro. I suspect it would take a lot of tweaking to make it look right.

In the code below I created a new ArcObjects console app, changed the target framework to 4.8, and added a reference to C:Program FilesArcGISProinArcGIS.Core.dll, which fortunately is compatible with 32 bit.

Do you have access to the ArcObjects SDK?

If so, it might be easier to write an ArcObjects app that translates renderers, symbols etc. from ArcObjects into CIM objects. Esri seems to be using CIM as the common foundation across all apps - except for Arcmap.

All CIM objects can be serialized to json. A symbology translator could read from mxds (using ArcObjects) and write json files (using ArcGIS.Core.CIM). You could then have a Pro Addin to deserialize the json to display it in Pro. I suspect it would take a lot of tweaking to make it look right.

In the code below I created a new ArcObjects console app, changed the target framework to 4.8, and added a reference to C:Program FilesArcGISProinArcGIS.Core.dll, which fortunately is compatible with 32 bit.

Thank you very much for your response, Kirk. The application I'm working on is using the ArcGIS Pro SDK. Would it still be possible to use ArcObjects in this case? If not, is there an equivalent way to do this just in the Pro SDK?

ArcGIS Pro and ArcMap can be installed "side by side" - they are different applications entirely. Same with the SDKs. I've got SDKs for both ArcObjects and Pro installed with VS2019.

That being said, it seems like ItemFactory would use some subset of ArcObjects behind the scenes to import mxds, but I don't see any methods ItemFactory exposes that would let you get at the internals.

Since you said " I want to do this when the Pro application is not running", I take that to mean you'd like to write a standalone app. I'm not certain, but I don't think lyrx files can be generated from a CoreHost app.

Arcmap is only slightly CIM-aware. When I use the Create Runtime Content tool from within Arcmap, it creates a folder that contains a sqlite geodatabase. Within that geodatabase is a table for each layer with an AdvancedDrawingInfo column. The json in that table looks like this:

So maybe there would be some way to use Runtime Content as a way to migrate symbology. I suspect it's only capable of very simple symbols, but might be worth a try.


Create FeatureService .sd file of MXD using  .sde connection through python

I would like to generate a .sd file for a feature service through python.

  • We are using ArcGIS Server 10.2.2
  • We are using an oracle database to house all of the data. GeoDatabases are not an option. It must be oracle.
  • All mxds connect to layers in the oracle database through .sde files
  • We are publishing map services for viewing in a browser, and feature services for editing data in a browser.
  • We do not have direct access to the ArcGIS Servers. We have to give all of the required ArcGIS content to an employee who is responsible for doing the migrations.
  • We have three environments: dev, test, prod. Every time we update an mxd, we need to do the following:
    • set datasources on every mxd to point to the corresponding environments.
    • create .sd files to give to the employee responsible for the migrations

    This process can be tedious if done by hand, so I have scripted most of it out. I can update the datasources for all of the mxds and create .sd files for map services just fine, but my problem is with the feature services. I cannot get the .sd file that I generate for feature services to run on the ArcGIS server. I have followed the instructions in example 7 of this page: ArcGIS Help (10.2, 10.2.1, and 10.2.2) , but every time I upload the .sd file to manager, i get the following error:

    Could not find resource or operation 'FeatureServer' on the system.

    Here is my python code to create the .sddraft file.

    def make_sd_draft(mxdPath, serviceName):

    """Ceate a draft SD and modify the properties to overwrite an existing FS."""

    # All paths are built by joining names to the tempPath

    SDdraft = os.path.join(tempDir, serviceName + ".sddraft")

    newSDdraft = os.path.join(tempDir, serviceName + "_updated.sddraft")

    arcpy.mapping.CreateMapSDDraft(mxd, SDdraft, serviceName, "MY_HOSTED_SERVICES")

    #open the SDDraft file and replace any &quot entities with something else that we can restore later

    replaceInFile(SDdraft, '&quot', 'zzzzzQuotezzzzz')

    # Read the contents of the original SDDraft into an xml parser

    if root_elem.tag != "SVCManifest":

    raise ValueError("Root tag is incorrect. Is <> a .sddraft file?".format(SDDraft))


    Staff Environmental Scientist - GIS

    Burns & McDonnell's Environmental Studies & Permitting practice currently has an opening for an Environmental Scientist to join our team. Primary responsibilities include GIS analysis, mapping and database management research and preparation of environmental reports and assessments field surveys as needed and other duties as assigned. GIS duties would include map production in accordance with standards and industry best practices using ArcGIS software, preparation and use of GIS data for analysis, GIS data conversion/migration, edit and create GIS data in geodatabase environment, and develop and support GIS workflows. Although position will have a strong emphasis on GIS applications that include all phases of GIS map production and GIS data management, position may also include a mix of report preparation, field assessments, and travel. Additionally, other technical experience such as archeology, wetlands, and biology are desired.

    Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in GIS, geography, environmental science, or closely related natural science field, with master's degree in similar field a plus. A minimum of 5 years related experience is required. Experience working in the ArcGIS desktop environment is required (ArcGIS Desktop 10.0 or higher a plus). Excellent GIS skills, including data analysis abilities. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Strong analytical and problem solving skills. Proficient computer skills including Microsoft Office suite. Prior GPS and applicable natural science field experience a plus. Travel is estimated at 25%. EEO/Minorities/Females/Disabled/Veterans.


    Learn ArcGIS Hub

    The new Learn ArcGIS Hub experience provides collections of curated content to guide you in your discovery and exploration of ArcGIS capabilities and products. From beginners and students to advanced users and educators, the Learn ArcGIS Hub can help you learn, teach, and advance your GIS careers. You can learn at your own pace based on your needs and interests, and use the knowledge you gain from to help the GIS community change our world for the better.


    How to open a*.mdb file in ArcGIS 10?

    I am totally new to GIS. My advisor has just given me a *.mdb file and I want to open it in ArcGIS 10. Not even sure if that's the right GIS product I should use!! I have been spending like 2 hours looking for a way to open the file but haven't been able to. Could somebody let m eknow how to do that?

    by HeatherMcCracke n

    An .mdb is a type of ESRI geodatabase - a personal geodatabase. A geodatabase is essentially a collection of geographic datasets. You can see the contents of your geodatabase using an ESRI application like ArcMap. "ArcMap is where you display and explore GIS datasets for your study area, where you assign symbols, and where you create map layouts for printing or publication. ArcMap is also the application you use to create and edit datasets"

    Here are a couple of links to web help topics which will help guide you.
    Essentially, you can open ArcMap, open the catalog window, and navigate to your .mdb on disk, and you will be able to discover the contents of your geodatabase. Using ArcMap you can visualize and analyze your data etc.

    It may seem overwhelming at the moment - but I hope these topics will have everything you need.

    Best of luck! Let us know how it goes or if you have any questions.
    -Heather

    by JoeBorgione

    I am totally new to GIS. My advisor has just given me a *.mdb file and I want to open it in ArcGIS 10. Not even sure if that's the right GIS product I should use!! I have been spending like 2 hours looking for a way to open the file but haven't been able to. Could somebody let m eknow how to do that?


    .mdb typically indicates a M icrosoft Access D ata B ase.

    In ArcGIS, one can create what is known as a personal geodatabase to store spatial data. Built into ArcGIS is the Microsoft Database Engine which allows this functionality you do not need Access installed. The database provided to you may or may not hold spatial data. It might just be a generic Access database.

    A good place to start is here the online help . Click on the data management link and then the Managing Geodatases link for geodatabase information.

    [edited moments after posting: Looks like Heather with ESRI beat me to it. Her reply must have come through as I was typing mine. Now you've got some consitent information to follow through with. Good luck! ]


    Customizing ArcReader

    The ArcReader applications are not customizable. However, the ArcReader Control is able to create custom ArcReader applications [2] . User with a Publisher license is able to create a custom ArcReader application which allows viewing, exploring, and printing published maps.

    The Publisher license also enables user to modify the ArcReader template using the ArcReader Configuration Developer tool. The ArcReader template is a binary file that stores ArcReader settings. The template allows settings from one ArcReader session to be initialized in the next ArcReader session.


    We are seeking activity submissions for K-12 classrooms that address the Earth Science Week 2021 theme: "Water Today and For the Future." Do you have a K-12 activity that fits the theme? Submit it today to the Teach the Earth portal!

    We're excited to announce that registration and abstract submission are now open for the seventh annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous, taking place online, from July 12-16, 2021!

    NAGT continues to support the crucial movement and petition for the Call for a Robust Anti-racism Plan for the Geosciences.


    My Intro to GIS Final Project- Georgia UFO Sightings

    I hope nobody in my Intro class has one this nice or mine is going to look pretty poor by comparison.

    Thanks! It was a lot of work, but I learned a lot about geoprocessing and statistics!

    Where did you get the data for the sightings?

    National UFO Reporting Center for sightings, USDA website for education levels and population, National Center for Education Statistics for literacy rates, and user GEFA10 from ARCGIS Online for Georgia basemap.

    You did a great job! I also just finished my into to GIS class and my maps don't look as nice as yours do. Nicely done!

    Thank you so much! I had a ton of fun working on it.

    Thank you very much! Looking forward to my advanced class next semester.

    Thank you for your response!

    What a great idea! I wanted to do some sort of analysis with UFO sightings when I was taking GIS classes, but couldn't think of anything. This is really neat:) way to go!

    It was troublesome to complete without any point data. I was pretty limited by this in terms of geoprocessing. I like how it turned out, but I was definitely regretting my choice halfway through. Point data would have led to more thorough analysis.


    Watch the video: Convert MXD File to Old Version MXD Doctor