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Opening MPK file without ArcGIS Desktop?

Opening MPK file without ArcGIS Desktop?


Is there any way to open an ArcGIS map package (*.mpk) file with MapInfo?

I do not have access to ArcGIS Desktop.


Inside an MPK you'll find an MXD and a fGDB. (You may find shapefiles, tiffs or other files depending on how the MPK was created, but odds are you'll find data in the fGDB).

With this knowledge, if you have an application other than ArcGIS that can read MXDs and fGDB, you can simply unzip an MPK (using something like 7zip. The built in Windows Zip Extractor software will not work) to get at the contents.

As for a program that offers native support to read an MPK that isn't Arc* -- I haven't heard of any.


Change the file extension from .mpk to .zip. Attempting to open the file should automatically unzip the contents.


This method works for Mac OS if the default Archive Utility did not work.

  1. Change the file extension from.mpkto.zip
  2. Download keka and install on Mac
  3. Right click file and open with keka

Share a map package

Map packages ( .mpkx files) allow you to share complete maps. A map package is a file that contains a map ( .mapx ) and the data referenced by its layers. You can use map packages to share maps between colleagues in a work group, across departments in an organization, or with other ArcGIS users through ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS Enterprise . Map packages also allow you to create an archive of a particular map that contains a snapshot of the current state of the data used in the map.


Create a mobile map package

Simple features, raster datasets, tables, relationship classes, locators, network datasets, web layers, and maps that contain map tile ( .tpk ) or vector tile ( .vtpk ) packages are supported in mobile map packages. However, topology, ArcGIS Desktop annotation, and route layers are not supported. Annotation that has been upgraded to ArcGIS Pro annotation is supported.

The Package Mobile Map pane appears.

  • Choose Current Display Extent to include all data that is visible on the screen.
  • Choose Area of Interest to include only data that intersects a polygon layer or feature class.

Everything in the map that's outside the current extent is excluded from the package. This further reduces the package size by clipping features that are partially outside the map extent.

  • If a locator has been added to your project, it appears in the drop-down menu.
  • To browse to a locator that has not been added to your project, click the browse button .

This means they will not be prompted to sign in to an ArcGIS organization account when using the package in apps such as ArcGIS Explorer .

  • Everyone —This option makes your content public. Anyone can access and see it.
  • My Organization —If you are signed in with an organizational account, you see this option. This option allows your content to be shared with all authenticated users in the organization.
  • Groups —You can share your content with groups you belong to and their members.

Leave all options unchecked to set the sharing level to the owner of the item.

This warns the user that the expiration date has passed but still allows access to the map.

This prevents the map from being accessed after the expiration date.

Optionally, edit the text in the Expiration message text box.

You can still open an expired mobile map in ArcGIS Pro .

Errors and warnings are listed on the Messages tab. Right-click a message to open its help topic or take corrective action in the software. Errors must be resolved before you can share the web layer. Resolving warnings is recommended but not required.

For details about how to create a mobile map package specifically for Navigator , see Prepare maps in the Navigator help system. For details about using mobile map packages in native apps you develop, see Display a map from a mobile map package.


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Additional ArcGIS Software

ArcGIS Online takes the most commonly used functionality from Desktop and puts it into your browser (e.g., Chrome) so you can easily create and share your data without having to install additional software. The basic version of ArcGIS Online is free and you can set up an account here. UNT does have an ArcGIS Online Organizational account available for limited use - please contact your GIS Librarian for more information. If using Web App Builder, this website has a few additional tools that might be helpful. For an introduction to Web GIS capabilities/tutorial, check out Getting to Know Web GIS.

To extend the capabilities of the ArcGIS Online Organizational account, UNT has two optional packages:

    - up-to-date demographic and tapestry data that can be easily searched to answer a variety of questions (see image below for an example) - similar to Community Analyst, except with a focus on businesses and marketing potential

This screen capture illustrates the results of a SmartSearch in Community Analyst to highlight areas with high rates of diabetes, obesity, no car ownership and high percentages of poverty that could be used to identify areas that could benefit from community assistance programs:


Can't open a .qgz file?

When you double-click a file to open it, Windows examines the filename extension. If Windows recognizes the filename extension, it opens the file in the program that is associated with that filename extension. When Windows does not recognize a filename extension, you receive the following message:

Windows can't open this file:

To open this file, Windows needs to know what program you want to use to open it. Windows can go online to look it up automatically, or you can manually select one from a list of programs that are installed on your computer.

To avoid this error, you need to set the file association correctly.

  • Open Control Panel > Control Panel Home > Default Programs > Set Associations.
  • Select a file type in the list and click Change Program.

Use basemaps on your device

Basemaps provide the frame of reference for your data. When working offline, you can use basemaps on your device instead of downloading a basemap for each map you use offline. This has a few advantages: it's faster in most cases and allows you to prepare basemaps for much larger areas.

  1. Prepare a tile package ( .tpk ) using ArcGIS Desktop . For details, see How to create a tile package in the ArcGIS help.
  2. Plug your device in to your computer.
  3. Open iTunes and select your device.
  4. Under Settings , click File Sharing .
  5. In the Apps list, select Collector .
  6. Drag the tile package ( .tpk ) into the Collector Documents section.
  7. Click Sync to copy the tile package to your device.
  8. Restart Collector on your device.

Get Started

Install ArcGIS Pro (the newest GIS software from ESRI) or ArcGIS Desktop. QGIS is also a great free, open-source option.

Make a basic map: Just need to make a quick map. Use our flow chart to find out how.

MIT GeoWeb: Start your search for geographic information here. You can search for GIS data held at MIT and other colleges.

Need to use software in the lab? Find out what is installed where.

MITGIS email list: Subscribe to get updates about GIS related events, new GIS data and software, and more.


Using Geospatial Tools to Assess Urban Tree Canopy

Classified tree canopy layer in the Virginia Urban Tree Canopy Mapper – http://www.utcmapper.frec.vt.edu

Urban forests can be defined as the sum of all woody and associated vegetation in and around dense human settlements (Miller 1997). The people living in and around urban forests receive many direct and indirect benefits, such as the cooling effect of strategically placed trees around a house or the reduced costs of storm-water management (Konijnendijk et al. 2005). In order to estimate the social and ecosystem &hellip


Can't open a .timestamp file?

When you double-click a file to open it, Windows examines the filename extension. If Windows recognizes the filename extension, it opens the file in the program that is associated with that filename extension. When Windows does not recognize a filename extension, you receive the following message:

Windows can't open this file:

To open this file, Windows needs to know what program you want to use to open it. Windows can go online to look it up automatically, or you can manually select one from a list of programs that are installed on your computer.

To avoid this error, you need to set the file association correctly.

  • Open Control Panel > Control Panel Home > Default Programs > Set Associations.
  • Select a file type in the list and click Change Program.

Add route layers

If you are signed in with an organizational account, you can use Map Viewer to get directions and create a route layer in your map. If you have privileges to create content, you can save the route layer as an item on the My Content tab of the content page, save the layer with the map, or both. If you save the route layer as an item, you can edit its item details and share it with others. Any existing route layer item can be added to a new or existing map from My Content or the layer's item page, or by using the Search for Layers option in the Map Viewer Add menu. You can also add route layers that were created as output from analysis tools such as Find Nearest, Plan Routes, and Connect Origins to Destinations if these route layers were saved as items.

In Map Viewer , you can configure the layer, edit the route, and perform analysis on the route. Like any other map, maps that have one or more route layers can be configured shared through a web app, story template, blog, and so on and used in an ArcGIS Enterprise client such as an iOS device, Android phone, and ArcGIS Desktop .

Create a new route layer

To create a new route layer, do the following:

  1. Sign in to the portal.
  2. Open Map Viewer .
  3. Click Directions to display the Directions pane to the left of the map. Get directions by adding an origin and one or more destinations.
  4. Click the Save button , enter a name for the layer, and choose a folder in which to save the route. Click Save .

To save the route layer, you must have privileges to create content.

  • Click Share the route to view and edit the item details for the route layer or share it with others. as needed, including adding destinations, changing the travel mode, and so on.
  • Configure the route layer as needed, including changing the transparency, renaming it, and so on. To do this, close the Directions pane, go to the Contents pane, and click the More Options button to see options for configuring the layer.

After the route has been saved, you can make further changes to the route from the Contents pane, including adding destinations, changing the travel mode, and so on, by clicking the More Options button in the Contents pane and clicking Edit Route . This opens the Directions pane where you can edit your route.

If you want to save the updated route as a different route layer item, change the Result layer name and folder as needed and click Save as new .

Add an existing route layer

If you have an existing route layer that you want to configure or edit in Map Viewer , do the following:

  1. Sign in to the portal.
  2. Do one of the following to add an existing route layer to the map:
    • Open Map Viewer and add the route layer to the map using the Search for Layers option.
    • From the My Content tab of the content page, click the thumbnail for the route layer in list view or grid view.

The route appears on the map with the Directions pane displayed.

    as needed, including adding destinations, changing the travel mode, and so on. as needed, including changing the transparency, renaming it, and so on. To do this, close the Directions pane, go to the Contents pane, and click the More Options button to see options for configuring the layer.

To save the route layer, you must have privileges to create content.

  • From the Contents pane, click the More Options button and click Save Layer .
  • From the Directions pane, click the Save button and click Save .
  • If you want to save the updated route as a different route layer item, change the Result layer name and folder as needed and click Save as new .

After the route has been saved, you can make further changes to the route from the Contents pane—including adding destinations, changing the travel mode, and so on—by clicking the More Options button in the Contents pane and clicking Edit Route . This opens the Directions pane.

Configure the route layer

If you intend to share your route with others (and have sharing privileges), you may want to configure the route layer for your specific audience. For example, if you work for an emergency management agency and plan to share a map of evacuation routes with your police department, you may want to rename the route layer in the Contents pane and change the route name in the pop-ups to the names the police department uses.

On the route layer, you can change the transparency, rename the layer, hide it in the legend, and edit the route and save your changes to the layer. You can also move the layer up or down in the Contents pane if you have other feature layers in your map. You can access these options from the More Options button in the Contents pane.

The route layer contains the sublayers listed below. On each sublayer, you can set the visibility, configure pop-ups, change the style, view the attribute table, create labels, and hide the layer in the legend. You cannot change the name of the sublayers.

  • DirectionPoints —A set of point features representing the direction maneuvers such as arriving to or departing from a stop, turning left or right, and other events along your route. This layer contains the route's turn-by-turn directions. By default, this layer is not displayed on the map. You can display it by checking the box next to the layer name in the Contents pane.
  • DirectionLines —A set of line features for each segment of your route. This layer can be used to visualize the turn-by-turn directions on a map. By default, this layer is not displayed. You can display it by checking the box next to the layer name in the Contents pane.
  • RouteInfo —A line feature layer of your route. This layer includes the total drive time and distance.
  • Stops —A point feature layer of your origin and destination or destinations.
  • Barriers —A point feature layer that contains any restriction or added cost point barriers added. This sublayer is only created when point barriers have been added and saved to the route.
  • PolygonBarriers —A polygon feature layer that contains any restriction or scaled cost polygon barriers added. This sublayer is only created when polygon barriers have been added and saved to the route.
  • PolylineBarriers —A line feature layer that contains any restriction line barriers added. This sublayer is only created when line barriers have been added and saved to the route.

To learn more about the types of barriers that can be added to a route, see Barriers. At this time, only restriction line barriers can be created in Map Viewer . However, all types of barriers can be created and saved with routes in ArcGIS Desktop and can be viewed in Map Viewer .